Finding the Right Dose: How Much Ashwagandha Do I Need?

Finding the Right Dose: How Much Ashwagandha Do I Need?

Ashwagandha, an ancient medicinal herb, has gained popularity for its potential health benefits, including stress reduction and improved cognitive function. However, determining the right dosage can be challenging as individual needs vary.

Here's a guide to help you navigate the optimal amount of ashwagandha for your well-being, supported by scientific research, and tailored to the specific purpose for which you are taking it.

Recommended Dosages of ashwagandha

Find the information about the right dosages of ashwagandha supplements for certain medical conditions in the text below. 

1. Stress Management

According to multiple studies, daily doses between 225–600 mg for 1–2 months have been shown to significantly lower cortisol levels.1-3

Additionally, one study found that taking at least 600 mg of ashwagandha per day for 8 weeks may help reduce anxiety and even improve sleep quality for people with stress or insomnia.4

2. Cognitive Function

In an 8-week study, the ingestion of 300 mg of ashwagandha root extract twice daily demonstrated noteworthy improvements in overall memory, attention, and task performance compared to placebo.5

Similarly, another study revealed that a daily intake of the same amount for over 90 days significantly enhanced memory and focus in adults experiencing high stress levels.6

3. Sleep Aid

Ashwagandha is also known for its potential to improve sleep quality. A dosage of 250–500 mg before bedtime may help promote relaxation and support better sleep.

This was supported by several clinical trials particularly a 6-week study involving individuals with sleep problems, wherein it was noted that those taking ashwagandha had greater improvements in sleep quality. Notably, those taking ashwagandha extract exhibited positive changes in sleep efficiency, total sleep time, and sleep latency, and reported overall improvement in quality of life.7

Final Words

Ashwagandha can be a valuable addition to your wellness routine, but finding the right dosage requires careful consideration of various factors. Starting with a lower dose and adjusting gradually while monitoring your body's response is a prudent approach.

Remember, individual responses may vary, and professional guidance ensures a safe and effective incorporation of ashwagandha into your health regimen.

 

References:

  1. Lopresti, A. L., Smith, S. J., Malvi, H., & Kodgule, R. (2019). An investigation into the stress-relieving and pharmacological actions of an ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) extract: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Medicine, 98(37), e17186. https://doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000017186.
  2. Salve, J., Pate, S., Debnath, K., & Langade, D. (2019). Adaptogenic and Anxiolytic Effects of Ashwagandha Root Extract in Healthy Adults: A Double-blind, Randomized, Placebo-controlled Clinical Study. Cureus, 11(12), e6466. https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.6466.
  3. Remenapp, A., Coyle, K., Orange, T., Lynch, T., Hooper, D., Hooper, S., Conway, K., & Hausenblas, H. A. (2022). Efficacy of Withania somnifera supplementation on adult's cognition and mood. Journal of Ayurveda and integrative medicine, 13(2), 100510. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaim.2021.08.003.
  4. Cheah, K. L., Norhayati, M. N., Husniati Yaacob, L., & Abdul Rahman, R. (2021). Effect of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) extract on sleep: A systematic review and meta-analysis. PloS one, 16(9), e0257843. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0257843.
  5. Choudhary, D., Bhattacharyya, S., & Bose, S. (2017). Efficacy and Safety of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal) Root Extract in Improving Memory and Cognitive Functions. Journal of dietary supplements, 14(6), 599–612. https://doi.org/10.1080/19390211.2017.1284970.
  6. Gopukumar, K., Thanawala, S., Somepalli, V., Rao, T. S. S., Thamatam, V. B., & Chauhan, S. (2021). Efficacy and Safety of Ashwagandha Root Extract on Cognitive Functions in Healthy, Stressed Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2021, 8254344. https://doi.org/10.1155/2021/8254344.
  7. Deshpande, A., Irani, N., Balkrishnan, R., & Benny, I. R. (2020). A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study to evaluate the effects of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) extract on sleep quality in healthy adults. Sleep medicine, 72, 28–36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2020.03.012.
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